Finding Beauty in Unexpected Places

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Blog, Uncategorized | No Comments

Recent Additions and Re-Do’s from the Gravel Pit Series

Fascination.   Glacier.  Limestone, rocks, Maine.  Home.   Erratic boulders out of proportion to the landscape.  Remains.  Exposure.  The earth is flayed and tortured.  Large open pits.  Lost topsoil, trees, habitat – you expect to find no life no beauty in this moonscape of human desire for roads and building. Progress.  However wandering the vast pit there are footprints in the clay and gravel; weasel and coyote, fox and raccoon.  A kestrel hovers;  and in the early morning and evening large flocks of swallows gather above the exposed aquifers seeking mosquitoes.   Hawks ride the thermals generated by the sand and rock.  Weedy trees and plants struggle up and in through the inhospitable surface.  The tones of dark and light are ever changing.  I am trying to improve my ability to shoot a good exposure right out of the camera and in the post processing working with luminosity techniques to convey what I see.  Keeping it simple and real.  Burning and dodging.   I have many photos to reprocess for print.

 

Gravel Pit Series

Gravel Pit Series

Gravel Pit in Winter

Gravel Pit in Winter

Gravel Pit Series

Gravel Pit Series

‘Large gravel deposits are a common geological feature, being formed as a result of the weathering and erosion of rocks. The action of rivers and waves tends to pile up gravel in large accumulations. This can sometimes result in gravel becoming compacted and concreted into the sedimentary rock called conglomerate. Where natural gravel deposits are insufficient for human purposes, gravel is often produced by quarrying and crushing hard-wearing rocks, such as sandstone, limestone, or basalt. Quarries where gravel is extracted are known as gravel pits.’ Wikipedia

‘Toward the end of the “Ice Age,” a glacier of vast proportions covered Maine. This was the Laurentide Ice Sheet, which advanced southward out of Canada about 25,000 years ago and remained here for nearly 15,000 years. From a practical standpoint, many moraines provide important supplies of sand and gravel or sandy till that are useful for construction purposes. Depending on composition, they may also constitute significant aquifers. In many coastal communities, sandy moraine ridges provide good elevated building sites and opportunities for domestic sewage disposal in areas otherwise underlain by poorly-drained clay or bedrock outcrops. The large moraine fields in eastern Maine have sandy soils which are extensively cultivated for blueberries.’ The Maine Geological Survey